USING SOCIAL MEDIA FOR ESL LEARNING – TWITTER VS. PINTEREST

Ana-Maria CHISEGA-NEGRILA

Abstract


E-learning 2.0 has marked the change from individual, passive learning, to student’s collaborating to improve their knowledge. Multitasking and ubiquitous computing represented a turning point in learners’ using various devices to gain information. The Internet extended from the desktop towards iPhones, tablets, etc. while classroom activities escaped the traditional framework and moved on to the virtual medium. Differentiated instruction has represented the dawn of modern instruction and gained momentum due to the changes in the Information Society. Social media have thus become extremely popular among learners as it transformed their experience in an entertaining and engaging one. If Facebook and Twitter have already become commonplace in terms of public use and acceptance as learning tools, other platforms seem to have emerged in the last years in an attempt to topple the popularity of the former. Gaining impetus in the last years, Pinterest has drawn the attention of ESL teacher because of its benefits to visual learners, its resemblance to the ESL textbooks, and its use as an online scrapbook suitable to incorporate a variety of materials (pictures, infographics, media files, links etc.).

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References


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